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Tiger Attacking a Young Camel (Tigre terrassant un jeune chameau)

Christoph Fratin’s work epitomizes the genre of nineteenth-century French sculpture featuring animal subjects known as animalier. Tiger Attacking a Young Camel was first exhibited as a plaster model at the Paris Salon in 1834. Fratin, who did not have ready access to a bronze foundry, did not have the piece cast until several years later. The Eskenazi Museum of Art bronze is unfinished: the supports holding the individual sections of the cast together are visible. The rough surface of this work, combined with Fratin’s expressionistic treatment of its violent subject matter, recall French Romantic paintings such as Eugène Delacroix’s depictions of lion hunts.

Christophe Fratin
French, 1801‒1864
Tiger Attacking a Young Camel (Tigre terrassant un jeune chameau)
1834–45
Bronze
7 9/16 x 9 x 15 15/16 in. (19.2 x 22.9 x 40.5 cm)
Sidney and Lois Eskenazi Museum of Art, Arthur R. Metz Collection; Gift of the Arthur R. Metz Foundation, 94.75