IU

Indiana University Bloomington IU Bloomington IUB

Roman

Roman culture developed in stages: first as a monarchy, then a republic, and finally an empire. The arts were effectively used to support the idea of community, citizenship, and centralized power throughout these changes and as Roman territory rapidly expanded. Portraits of rulers, for instance, propagated the idea of benevolent authority to the far reaches of the Roman world. The museum's collection includes fascinating examples of this propaganda, from exquisitely carved marble busts to coins. Other fine art objects highlight Roman religious beliefs and aspects of daily life.

Romano-Egyptian
Ring with Busts of Serapis and Isis
Imperial period, 1st century BC–1st century AD
Gold, garnet
Diam. 7/8 in. (2.2 cm)
Sidney and Lois Eskenazi Museum of Art, 76.72.5

Romano-Egyptian
Ring with Snake
Imperial period, 1st–4th century AD
Gold, garnet
Diam. 15/16 in. (2.4 cm)
Sidney and Lois Eskenazi Museum of Art, Burton Y. Berry Collection, 65.87.13

Romano-Egyptian
Ivory Head of Serapis
Imperial period, 2nd–3rd century AD
Ivory
H. 3 1/2 in. (8.89 cm), W. (at modius) 1 1/4 in. (3.2 cm)
Sidney and Lois Eskenazi Museum of Art, 76.34.55