Colour Balance: Race, Technologies, and "Intelligent Design"

1:00 P.M. – 2:15 P.M.
Tuesday, September 25, 2018

Hodge Hall, Kelley School of Business, room 2083
1309 E 10th St, Bloomington, IN 47405
Free

This lecture is part of the IU Black Film Center/Archive's Lecture series "Before Representation: Examining Visual Technologies of Race, Media, and Meaning." It is presented here in conjunction with the fall exhibition Out of Easy Reach at IU's Grunwald Gallery

Dr. Lorna Roth, Professor Emeritus, Communication Studies, Concordia University lectures and offers a workshop in which she examines the ways in which “skin colour has been imagined, embedded and colour-shifted over time in products and technologies.” Dr. Roth asks, “How do manufacturers and marketers of “flesh” colored products deal with the fact that we are not all Caucasian?” In 2009, Dr. Roth wrote that “until recently due to a light-skin bias embedded in colour film stock emulsions and digital camera design, the rendering of non-Caucasian skin tones was highly deficient….” Dr. Roth’s path-breaking concept of “cognitive equity” spurs us to think about equity at the level of inscribing wider dynamic range of skin tones into image technologies, products, and emergent practices in the visual industries.